Alison Norman © Alison Norman. All rights reserved.

Teaching

Course Directorships CAST2255, A History of Indians of Canada. Trent University, Department of Canadian Studies, September 2014-April 2015. This second year lecture and seminar course is cross listed in History, Canadian Studies, and Indigenous Studies, and it is more properly titled A History of Indigenous Canada. The course examines the history and culture of Canadian First Nation communities from their creation centuries ago to the present day. The course ranges from the east to the west and the far north. Emphasis will be placed on several themes, including Aboriginal agency and various forms of activism, the impact of colonialism, the introduction and effects of Western forms of education, traditional and Western gender roles and relations, the development of “Indian” policy, traditional and new economies, and the modern political movement of today.   HIS366, Aboriginal People of the Great Lakes, 1815 to the Present.  The University of Toronto, Department of History, September 2013-December 2013; and January 2012 to April 2012. This third year lecture course examines the Aboriginal history of the Great Lakes region after the War of 1812 up until the present. The course begins with Haudenosaunee and Anishnaabeg creation stories and a look at the social and political structures and beliefs of the various First Nations in the region. The course then gives a brief overview of the post-Revolutionary period and the arrival of the Six Nations in Upper Canada and the establishment of reservations in the US and reserves in Canada. We proceed chronologically and thematically through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, looking at material culture, education, how colonialism effected gender relations, participation in the World Wars, post-war activism, and more recent history up to the Idle No More movement. Students were marked on a map quiz of the region, an essay proposal, a 12-14 page research essay on a topic of their choosing, and a final exam. I designed the syllabus, was responsible for all lectures, save for two guest lectures (including one by the Hon. Bob Rae), and all marking. HIS369, Aboriginal People of the Great Lakes to 1815. The University of Toronto, Department of History, September 2014-December 2014; September 2012-December 2012; and September 2010 to December 2010. This third year lecture course examines the Aboriginal history of the Great Lakes region, beginning with Haudenosaunee and Anishnaabeg creation stories, and examining the social and political structures and beliefs of the numerous First Nations in the region prior to contact. The course proceeds chronologically and thematically, with lectures on the arrival of Europeans, the effect of missionaries, disease and depopulation, material culture, Aboriginal involvement in Euro-American conflicts, new ways of living on reserves and reservations, and ending with Aboriginal participation in the War of 1812.  Student assessment included a map quiz, a primary source analysis, a 10-12 page book review (on a related topic, students chose from pairings), and a final exam. I designed the syllabus, was responsible for all lectures and most marking. HIS3160, Canadian Women’s History. The Department of History, Trent University, Department of History, September to late November 2010. This third year lecture course explores selected themes in the history of Canadian Women from before the arrival of Europeans to the beginning of the twentieth century. It compares women’s experiences as mothers, wives, workers, immigrants, colonizers and the colonized.  We will examine how their history was shaped by social constructions of gender, class, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, religion and region. The course also looks at how the field of women’s history has developed, and how the field has shaped our understanding of Canadian history. Students completed a historical assessment of a Heritage Minute featuring women, a primary source analysis, and a biographical assignment and an in-class test. I was responsible for designing the course and all lectures, tutorials and marking. CHST 680, Natives and Newcomers from 1763. The Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University, May 2012 to June 2012, and May 2010 to June 2010. This upper level Liberal Studies elective considers the following critical issues and questions in native-newcomer relations: How did the First Nations of the Great Lakes defend their interests when settlers flooded the region after 1763? What happened to them in the American Revolution and other frontier conflicts? What were the results for natives when Euroamericans forced them onto reservations or demanded they assimilate? What were the impacts of modernization after 1850? This course offers a range of intellectual challenges. We consider various ‘ways of knowing’ and the opportunities and problems associated with varying sources. CHST 680 also encourages students to consider common perceptions and invites them to broaden their appreciation of crucial aspects of North America’s past that resonate with contemporary native-newcomer issues. As well, it strives to improve student research, analytical, and literary abilities as part of their professional growth. CHST 580, Natives and Newcomers to 1763. The Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University, January 2012 to April 2012, and January 2010 to April 2010. This upper level Liberal Studies elective explores the main themes associated with North America’s First Nations as experienced by the peoples of the Great Lakes region of today’s Canada and the United States before the year 1763. Focusing our studies on one geographical area allows us to investigate indigenous history with greater depth than would be possible if our scope were larger. First we survey the long ‘pre-contact’ era dating back to the last ice age. Then we address the period from 1534 to 1763 when the region’s Algonkian, Iroquoian, and Siouan nations encountered Europeans (and some Africans) under conditions where the newcomers made their presence felt with increasing force through time but did not occupy significant amounts of land around the Great Lakes in conflict with indigenous use of the environment. This course offers a range of intellectual challenges. We consider various ‘ways of knowing’ and the opportunities and problems associated with varying sources. CHST 580 also encourages students to consider common perceptions and invites them to broaden their appreciation of crucial aspects of North America’s past that resonate with contemporary native-newcomer issues. As well, it strives to improve student research, analytical, and literary abilities as part of their professional growth. Enrollment: 10-20. HUM200, “The Development of Western Thought II.” Seneca College, Liberal Arts Program, York University Campus, Summer 2010, Winter 2010, Summer 2007, Winter 2007, Summer 2006. This course is a second semester course in the Liberal Arts Program, and it extends the themes introduced in HUM100. The course examines the origins and consequences of historical events, ideas, and concepts in the Western intellectual and cultural tradition. Taught by a team of Humanities specialists,, HUM200 draws upon a wide variety of academic disciplines (including art history, economics, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies). The course takes students through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. It focuses in particular on the rise of Christianity and its influence on medieval thought and society, feudal society, on the emergence of the Western European kingdoms, and on Renaissance Humanism. The multi-disciplinary approach, with its variety of lecturing faculty members,continues in HUM301. During the five semesters that I taught HUM200, I delivered a variety of lectures on medieval history, including the role of women, the Crusades, and medieval Christianity. I created and marked tests, assignments and exams. I also ran tutorials where students examined primary sources on a weekly basis. HUM301, “The Development of Western Thought III.” Seneca College, Liberal Arts Program, York University Campus, Fall 2005. This course extends the themes and chronology introduced in HUM 100 and HUM200 beginning with the Reformation and extended to the Enlightenment.  The course focuses in particular on the impact of the Protestant Reformation and religious warfare during the 16th and 17th centuries; the rise of centralized monarchies and the nation-state; the period beginning in the 15th century of European exploration, expansion, and colonization; the effects of early capitalism on the agricultural economy and traditional society; and the influence of the 17th century and the 18th century Enlightenment on European thought and culture. The multi-disciplinary approach, with its variety of lecturing faculty members, continues in HUM301, but places additional emphasis on a social history approach. I delivered lectures on multiple topics, including early modern women, and European expansion. I created and marked tests, assignments and exams, and ran tutorials where students examined primary source documents on a weekly basis. CAN191, “Canadian Political Economy.” Seneca College, Liberal Arts Program, York University Campus, Winter 2007. This senior level Liberal Arts course introduces students to selected themes in post-Confederation Canadian history using the methodologies of social history: Aboriginal peoples, women, the family, working class and labour movements, immigration, reform, urbanization and industrialization, the impact of war, and others. (The title of the course changed the following semester to CAN604, A Social History of Canada, but I taught it still under the old title). I created the syllabus, delivered all lectures, created and marked the assignments and exams, and ran all tutorials.